Don’t forget about DTC when migrating your vRealize Automation IaaS database

20161114-1HobbitCloud has been enjoying somewhat of an infrastructure refresh recently, with the entire estate being renamed and Windows Servers migrating to 2016 and 2019. Part of this project was to increase resilience in my on-premise data warehouse by implementing a Microsoft SQL Server 2016 AlwaysOn Availability Group (AAG) running on Windows Server Core. Continue reading

Moving vRealize Automation blueprints between environments with vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager 1.2

When large enterprises deploy a cloud management platform like VMware vRealize Automation, they often have a number of different environments. To ensure best practices, blueprints and orchestration scripts are created in development before being tested in another environment, before finally being transported into  Continue reading

Wednesday Tidbit: Enable VIC-as-a-Service on vRealize Automation with custom SSL certificates

20161114-1vRealize Automation brings a raft of benefits to an organisation. The biggest of these is the ability to enable users to consume complex services without having to rely on the corporate IT department. An example of this is the ability to provision a Docker endpoint, in the form of a vSphere Integrated Containers Virtual Container Host, for developers to deploy containers against. Continue reading

Deploying Kubernetes with vRealize Automation

20161114-1A number of customers are very excited about the upcoming release of PKS. However, some are itching to get started with Kubernetes today, and are wondering how they can leverage VMware’s Cloud Management Platform, vRealize Automation, to do so. In this post I will show how you can design a blueprint which with two clicks can deploy a Kubernetes cluster for your users.  Continue reading

Wednesday Tidbit: Stop failed vRealize Automation software deployments from auto-deleting

This will quite possibly be the shortest, but yet most useful, posts on vRealize Automation you’ve ever read…

If you regularly develop software components for vRA, you’ve undoubtedly discovered that if for some reason a deployment fails, the machine is automatically deleted within a couple of minutes. This is frustrating as it gives you no time to debug why it failed, as all evidence is deleted with the machine.

Thankfully, Sam McGeown shared the answer a couple of weeks back:

So there you have it. One custom property attached to your blueprint will enable you to see why your deployment failed.

This is one of those things I wished I’da known ages ago!